Who owns antiquity

One has to wonder if Cuno and Princeton!! He advocates restoration of the system under which source countries would share newly discovered artifacts in exchange for archaeological help, and he argues that museums should again be allowed reasonable ways to acquire undocumented antiquities.

But he also said: But not in terms of an identity with those ancient people. Nor does he seem to understand why they may want to prevent current and future theft. It also built the local museums and their collections. While the statements that these items may be better preserved in rich, stable countries with abundant resources seems noble, I found no offer to help build satisfactory preservation systems in the nations of origin.

Nor the incredible Haremhad statue detained at the Met. But in Who Owns Antiquity? I swear to God it took me nearly two years. Nineteen trinkets is nothing to crow about.

I do agree with Cuno that many of the national laws protecting cultural resources are based on an idea of static, nationally distinct cultures. Or amputating the torch arm on the Statue of Liberty, and passing it to Sierra Leon ooof…bad joke there, I know.

The Met has been quick to toot its own horn, saying the return of these objects was voluntary and that they were under no legal obligation to do anything. Cuno revists the imperialist claim that modern nation-state ethnic groups have no claim on the actions and achievements of their ancestors: The marbles are the frieze of the Parthenon.

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In that process, however, there must be some careful consideration because we have to find a way to avoid some of the problems brought on by the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act NAGPRA wherein remains have been returned to tribes who have no relation to those remains or where valuable scientific study has been stopped by a tribe that has no relation to the remains found on or near their current land.

View Citation summary Whether antiquities should be returned to the countries where they were found is one of the most urgent and controversial issues in the art world today, and it has pitted museums, private collectors, and dealers against source countries, archaeologists, and academics.

Stolen objects that reside in the great museums of the world are nothing more than a monument to imperialism and the days of overt exploitation.

Return to the Elgin marbles, for instance. Should we share them out with Vietnam? Maintaining that the acquisition of undocumented antiquities by museums encourages the looting of archaeological sites, countries such as Italy, Greece, Egypt, Turkey, and China have claimed ancient artifacts as state property, called for their return from museums around the world, and passed laws against their future export.

It is a very fine line to walk.

Who owns antiquity? : museums and the battle over our ancient heritage /

Well, what does that make Cuno and his ilk? We also need to recognize that, as Cuno correctly points out, culture is a process not a thing and that culture developed and continues to develop through interaction between cultures and over trade routes.

The Baghdad Museum, Kabul, Cairo, were built through the process of sharing the finds that foreign excavators found.

The Parthenon still exists. They comprise antiquity, and antiquity knows no borders. They comprise antiquity, and antiquity knows no borders. To Who owns antiquity this, Cuno calls for measures to broaden rather than restrict international access to antiquities.

Antiquities need to be protected from looting but also from nationalistic identity politics. Rarely do we see today such blatent cultural superiority except from my friend Frank, a Canadian who seriously thinks the remaining Amazonian tribes would be served best if they were moved wholesale into apartment buildings in Sao Paolo or Lima.

This is a tired century-old canard that claims an ethnic group has only a tenuous tie to their ancestors. He advocates restoration of the system under which source countries would share newly discovered artifacts in exchange for archaeological help, and he argues that museums should again be allowed reasonable ways to acquire undocumented antiquities.

It seems safest to eliminate that nationalisim infused scholarly hassle of who gets the goodies and let the countries where the artifacts lie take jurisdiction. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Nor the famous Nefertiti bust held in Berlin. I nearly fell off my chair when I read that. That would be Europe or America.

And have you taken a look at the new Acropolis Musuem? To do this, Cuno calls for measures to broaden rather than restrict international access to antiquities.Who Owns Antiquity? has ratings and 21 reviews. Jim said: One year ago, New York’s Metropolitan Museum announced that it will return 19 objects from /5.

View Notes - Who Owns Antiquity - James Cuno from ARTH at Cornell University. An article about museums and the theft of art. "Who really owns antiquity?" The answer might surprise you. Buy or Rent Who Owns Antiquity?

as an eTextbook and get instant access. With VitalSource, you can save up to 80% compared to print. Whether antiquities should be returned to the countries where they were found is one of the most urgent and controversial issues in the art world today, and it has pitted museums, private collectors, and dealers against source countries, archaeologists, and academics.

Maintaining that the. 'Who Owns Antiquity?: Museums and the Battle over Our Ancient Heritage' by James Cuno.

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Who owns antiquity
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